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Independent State of Samoa

Capital

Apia

Official Languages

Samoan, English

Area

2,842 km2

Population

192,342

Currency

Tala (WST)

Health overview

Non-communicable diseases are the main cause of premature mortality and morbidity, linked to a high prevalence of key risk factors. In 2013, half of the adult population between the ages of 18 and 64 years were at high risk of developing an NCD. Dietary risk factors are a major contributor to NCDs in Samoa; close to 85% of adults are overweight or obese, and around 62% of adults regularly consume processed foods high in salt. The dangers of emerging and re-emerging communicable disease, including dengue, chikungunya and Zika, highlight an ongoing vulnerability to outbreaks. Lymphatic filariasis remains endemic, with management through intensive mass drug administration campaigns.

Health workforce

WHO

Western Samoa was assigned to the Western Pacific Region at the Sixth World Health Assembly held in May 1953 "without prejudice to any questions regarding sovereignty" as an area. Western Samoa joined the World Health Organization on 16 May 1962 as a Member State after gaining its independence from New Zealand on 1 January 1962. From 1946 to 1961, Western Samoa was administered by New Zealand under a United Nations Trusteeship Agreement. In July 1997, the Constitution was amended to change the country’s name from Western Samoa to Samoa (officially the “Independent State of Samoa”).

The WHO Representative Office in the South Pacific covered Samoa from 1956 to 1968, the designation of a WHO Country Liaison Office in Apia. On 1 October 1986, the WHO Representative Office in Apia, Samoa was established and covers American Samoa, Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa and Tokelau.

Scholarships

There are several scholarships available for NUS Students.

https://www.nus.edu.ws/s/index.php/scholarships

Accrediting bodies

Council of the National University of Samoa. Subject to the National University of Samoa Act 2006 and to the Corporate Plan: (i) The freedom of the University to regulate the courses, and the subject-matter of courses, taught at the University; and (ii) The freedom of the University to teach and assess students in the manner it considers best promotes learning. 25. Statutes-(1) The Council may make such statutes, not inconsistent with this Act, as may in its opinion be necessary or expedient for the administration of the affairs of the University. (2) Without limiting the generality of subsection (1), the Council may make statutes with respect to: (h) The programmes and courses of study provided by the University and procedures for the assessment of student performance in those programmes and courses of study; (i) The degrees, diplomas, certificates or other awards that may be granted by the Council and the requirements for those awards.

Council of NUS
https://www.nus.edu.ws/s/index.php/nus-council-home

Council of Nursing and Midwifery (CNM): The Council of Nursing and Midwifery in Samoa is established by the Nursing and Midwifery Act 2007. The Functions and Powers of the Council are predominantly related to professional standards and competencies but include the powers to: “recognise courses of nursing education offered at the National University of Samoa as the basis for an entitlement to registration under the Act”; and “to advise the Ministry, the National Health Service and other Government agencies in relation to matters related to the provision of nursing services and the education of nurses and midwives in Samoa.”

http://www.parliament.gov.ws/documents/acts/Nursing and Midwifery 2007-English1.pdf

Geography and demographics

Samoa is a South Pacific country comprised of nine islands. Samoa has a relatively young population, of which 46% is aged 19 years or younger. Village communities and the extended family are central to the organisation of Samoan society, and they are the foundation of Fa’a Samoa, the traditional way of life in Samoa. Samoa gained its independence from New Zealand in 1962. Today, it is a parliamentary democracy, with a national legislative assembly made up of 49 members. Its head of state is elected every five years by universal suffrage. The main domestic sectors in Samoa are tourism, fisheries and external development assistance. The majority of Samoans are employed in subsistence agriculture and local commerce, and agricultural products are a primary export. These include coconut oil, copra, cocoa beans, and bananas.

Politics

Samoa gained its independence from New Zealand in 1962. Today, it is a parliamentary democracy, with a national legislative assembly made up of 49 members. Its head of state is elected every five years by universal suffrage.

Economy

The main domestic sectors in Samoa are tourism, services, and agriculture. The majority of Samoans are employed in subsistence agriculture and local commerce, and agricultural products are a primary export. These include coconut oil, copra, cocoa beans, and bananas. The currency is the Samoan Tala.

Tourism

Samoa is an adventure lover’s paradise, with plenty of water activities such as diving, surfing, snorkelling, kayaking and fishing. Other popular tourist sports include golf, rugby, and volleyball. Visitors can even hire a bike and explore the islands on their own. For a more relaxed atmosphere, there are several cultural activities on offer, such as visits to traditional villages, or simply winding down with a massage at one of the numerous relaxation spas.

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